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Optimal battery charging

Most days I drive 30 miles, and I top off the battery in about one hour at home in the evening. I have been wondering what is better for battery longevity (please point me to the thread if there is one already):

- Charging at 40A for one hour (roughly)
or
- Charging at 10A for several hours (presumably 4h)
or
- Charging at 5A all night

Also, does anyone know if there is some kind of power consumption overhead throughout the charging process? For instance, the car is making noise while charging and I'm assuming that it's some kind of temperature regulation of the battery. If I charge at 5A all night, am I consuming significantly more power because of that current draw overhead than if I finish charging in 1h?

I'm planning on installing a power measuring clamp on my 14-50 feed to find out exactly...

I have the same questions...and a couple more:

1. I can charge at my work. Should I top off at work, then come home and top off too?

2. If I'm out of town for a week, do I leave it plugged in the whole time, or top it off and unplug it?

3. What is the ideal temp for charging? (I don't have a heated garage, but just curious)

TM recommends leaving the car plugged in all the time. From page 16 of the Model S users manual:

"Tesla strongly recommends leaving Model S plugged in when not in use. This maximizes the lifetime of the Battery

Your Model S Battery is one of the most sophisticated battery systems in the world. The most important way to preserve the Battery is to LEAVE YOUR MODEL S PLUGGED IN when you’re not using it. This is particularly important if you are not planning to drive your Model S for several weeks. When plugged in, Model S wakes up when needed to automatically maintain a charge level that maximizes the lifetime of the Battery."

As for temp, from the same page:

"If the Battery requires heating or cooling, you may notice a delay before charging begins. Heating or cooling starts automatically when you plug in, and charging begins when the Battery reaches the appropriate temperature."

It doesn't say what the ideal temperature is.

Damn formatting. Try again:

TM recommends leaving the car plugged in all the time. From page 16 of the Model S users manual:

"Tesla strongly recommends leaving Model S plugged in when not in use. This maximizes the lifetime of the Battery

Your Model S Battery is one of the most sophisticated battery systems in the world. The most important way to preserve the Battery is to LEAVE YOUR MODEL S PLUGGED IN when you’re not using it. This is particularly important if you are not planning to drive your Model S for several weeks. When plugged in, Model S wakes up when needed to automatically maintain a charge level that maximizes the lifetime of the Battery."

As for temp, from the same page:

"If the Battery requires heating or cooling, you may notice a delay before charging begins. Heating or cooling starts automatically when you plug in, and charging begins when the Battery reaches the appropriate temperature."

It doesn't say what the ideal temperature is.

I've read here on the forums that it does indeed cost you more to charge slowly. Can't find the reference right now, but efficiency of charging suffers at lower amperage.

Does anyone know the following:

1. Rate of battery charge capacity reduction per year

2. How much power consumption occurs to maintain battery temperature in a hot Garage >100deg F- I live in Arizona.

Thanks
SS

@nickjhowe - I do leave the car plugged in all the time, whether I set the max charging current to 5A or to 40A. I think Tesla has done a good job of drilling this into our collective heads...

@STEVEZ - I'd be willing to pay a little more in electricity cost by charging at low current if it yields a measurable improvement in battery capacity over time. It also presumably keeps the battery warmer during cold winter nights and might preserve full regen bracking when I start driving in the morning.

I guess I could estimate the cost differential by looking at how long it takes to charge as a function of the current going in. That's assuming of course that the charge current indicator is accurate, and measured at the plug (not what actually goes into the battery.)

@jemartin - sorry, I was replying specifically to @trydesky's questions.

We haven't been able to charge our car for 7 days.........(before 4.2 update lost about 3-4 miles a day) now we've lost about 10-12 miles a day......anybody else notice that much of a loss? Temps: 40's am. 60-70's pm

I lose 8 miles in about 12 hours with 4.2. My loss was only slightly less with 4.1, with the sleep mode of 4.1. I don't know how much I would lose in 24 hours as I have not left it unplugged that long.


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