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Fisker stops production of the Karma...

I really don't see the appeal of a $100k hybrid. If you want a luxury hybrid buy a Lexus. I could never justify the price difference.

The reason I would spend that on a Tesla is the innovation of a pure electric car.....

Just my opinion.....

The main issues are:

1. You have to have a sustainable business model. All the pumping of federal funds, stimulus, celebrities, only goes so far. Without critical mass and real demand, the market will crash.

2. The market is pretty early. There will be lots of challengers and lots of incumbents waiting for challengers to fail. Like all new markets, we can expect consolidation, partnerships, and many failures.

3. This means even Tesla is not immune. The government loans and guarantees as well as the state led tax breaks an incentives are truly not sustainable. I wonder what the real production numbers have to be for a true breakeven or profitable year.

R

Yes, I agree... the Karma isn't really much other than a cool looking problematic hybrid (that is not very practical in the real-world).

I am curious to see what happens with the UK based 'Lightning GT' EV sports car… http://www.lightningcarcompany.co.uk/Lightning/Lightning.html

Or the Exagon Furtive eGT, for that matter.

Well, it's interesting to note that Fisker intends to continue building the Karma and merely sees the current production stop as an interruption beyond their control (b/c their battery supplier went bust). Strictly speaking it's A123 who is in first-hand trouble, dragging Fisker along with them as they drown...

"...pauses production..." would have been a more accurate title.

Lightly, I agree....

$100k for a car with average acceleration (so not really a sports car), no space (so not really a sedan), and problematic (so not really a dependable daily driver).

It irks me when people compare the Model S to the Karma...there is no comparison.

Volker,

Exagon Furtive eGT is cool, but has a stupid price-tag ($425k)

@rwang, 3) approx 8000 cars annually. That's how many they have to sell to break even. Reservations are well over that, so it's no problem.

I have to add to that that this loan program is a very smart and very good to US even if only one applicant actually succeeds to become a manufacturer. Every Tesla car sold that would have been some European car instead just stopped the cash flow from US to Europe for that car (batteries, IE. Panasonic still gets their share).

20000 cars annually, if even 10% of those would have been European/Japanese it would be 200 million dollars not gone to overseas. That's two years and loan has paid itself back even if Tesla itself would not pay it back.


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