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Touch screen shifting?

First of all, yes, I'm one of those that really doesn't like the shifter on a steering wheel lever. I know that I'm going to try to activate the wipers and accidentally shift the car into reverse and kill everyone on the road. (I'm joking of course)

Maybe I shouldn't have opened with that because I'm not that concerned about it. I just think it would be really cool if you could shift the car using the touch screen. This isn't just an electric car, it's an electronic car and a software car. It would be really cool and futuristic to have the car shift via touchscreen.

Yeah, I realize that this would be a problem if the car died and you need to push/tow it or something. You could have like an emergency physical shifter hidden under some panel or something for such situations.

To me, what's going to be so fun about this car is not that it's electric, but that it's finally showing the promise of marrying consumer electronics/computers with the actual user-facing functions of operating a car. In short it's futuristic.

Tesla cars have two gears: forward and reverse. That's it. You don't need to shift driving them.

Timo, I think this thing has Neutral as well. Why, I dont know. And of course park.

Olan, I suggest it's not a good idea to put critical functions on the touch screen. You want your steering, braking, accelerator and "engine" on/off functions to be mechanical, or isolated embedded devices. I don't want a browser crash for example to prevent me from putting the car in park.

I don't count neutral or park as gears. Now that I think of it, I don't know what those do. Tesla cars do not have traditional gearbox at all, no clutch or anything just reduction gear, so those don't do what they do in traditional cars. Some sort of electronic lock for engine as park and free rotation for neutral? Neutral is for towing I suppose.

And "park" engages the parking brake and disables the go-pedal.

And that's sort of my point. It's electronic anyways. There of course, should still be a physical, mechanical parking brake and release.

There's a big difference between having 1 relay operated by 1 real switch (parking brake) and having a computer with tons of software between the virtual button and the same relay.

And don't even think "but relays may go bad". Yes, they may, but maybe not as often as a mechanical linkage. 30 years ago (some) relays were having 1 failure per million relays per year. Train switches use them, too, which should tell you something about how reliable they are seen to be.


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