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any word on battery capacity loss after five years and ten years

The following article talks about battery capacity loss for Nissan Leaf:
http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1079343_nissan-suggests-leaf-battery...
"Starting in 2009, Nissan executives have consistently said the Leaf battery pack would retain 70 to 80 percent of its charge capacity after five years--and average roughly 70 percent capacity after 10 years."
Are there any statements from Tesla regarding what percentage of battery capacity loss we should expect in five and ten years?

Yes they have, but I think they have removed from the site (or maybe never had a specific statement on the site) any specific claim about the battery life, because there are a host of factors that will affect it.

I believe in the past, they have said perhaps in interviews and stuff, that after about 8 years, the battery capacity may be reduced to 70-80%, similar to the Leaf claims.

However, I should point out, that unlike the Leaf, the Model S has a robust battery management system which regulates temperature and charge and discharge.

Tesla's battery is smarter and that will help retain more capacity for a longer period of time.

The factors that affect the battery life are how often you drive, how far you drive, your manner of driving, how often you charge, how often you charge for max range, the climate, and more.

These factors can vary so much between different owners, that I think maybe Tesla did not want to put specific claims on the site.

FYI, neither the manual or the warranty makes a specific claim about battery life over time.

Leaf batteries turn out to have problems resulting from depending on air cooling, which turns out not to work so well in dry hot climates, especially at altitude. AZ is a "hotbed" of complaints just now.

High altitude has thinner air and thus the air has less capacity to draw heat away from the battery. So, I could understand why the Leaf has issue at high altitude.

IIRC Tesla said somewhere "at least 70% at ten years" (if you drive like sane person, I think), and somewhere else that Roadster is proving that in real life you have more capacity left after ten years (on average). Liquid cooling makes huge difference there.

@Brian H | SEPTEMBER 25, 2012: Leaf batteries turn out to have problems resulting from depending on air cooling, which turns out not to work so well in dry hot climates, especially at altitude. AZ is a "hotbed" of complaints just now.

Most of the complaints in Arizona are from Phoenix. The elevation there is about 1000ft. I have a Nissan Leaf and live in Tucson and the elevation is about 2500ft (actually 3100ft at my house). I have about a 10% loss of range. It's not as hot as in Phoenix here and my car spends most of its time in a garage. With only 14 months of use and about 10K miles, I was hoping for less range loss. I can't wait for the Model S, so I don't have to concern myself about heat.

10% loss in only 14 months and 10k miles is frightening. I hope Leaf warranty covers that.

@Timo | SEPTEMBER 26, 2012: 10% loss in only 14 months and 10k miles is frightening. I hope Leaf warranty covers that.

No, they don't cover that. Their battery warranty is as nebulous as the Tesla warranty. They warrant the battery for 8 years/100,000 miles, but exclude capacity loss. The 10% loss of range I have is based on my wakeup range. Since I usually have about 600ft of elevation gain when I get home, the range is about 64mi now. It was about 72 when new. But when driving around the flat parts of town the range is much higher (97mi vs 105mi). Seems that the range loss is greater when negotiating hills. The EPA range is something like 72 miles, so it's not overall bad.


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