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Cost per month

To all Tesla owners: How much would you say that you pay, per month, in order to charge your Roadster (on average)? Have you seen a significant increase in your electricity bill? I ask because I want to know how much I'm really saving when going from an ICE vehicle to a fully electrically vehicle. Thanks for the feedback!

Assume 200 Wh/km driven. Multiply that with how much you drive. Divide by 1000 to get kWh and multiply that with your average household tariff.
Example:
200 Wh/km x 800 km/month= 160'000 Wh/month = 160 kWh/month
A household tariff could be 15c/kwh and those 160 kWh would cost you then 24$/month.

Look now at your electricity bill. Some might not notice the difference the car makes. Of course your mileage might vary...

-Alfred
http://web.me.com/alfredar/Alfreds_Pages/Electric_Cars.html

Of course, as they say, your mileage may vary. I've got a kill-o-watt meter that measures electrical flow, unfortunately it only works for 120V outlets. Any estimate like the above should include
the penalty one pays for putting juice into and out of a battery
(if not already accounted for in the claimed mileage numbers), which is not insignificant. A roughly 25% penalty is not uncommon, which would mean that a Tesla (or any electric) that consumes 100 kWhr of power in driving had to feed the car's battery somewhere around 133 kWhrs. The battery engineers at Tesla would be able to
state whether those claimed mileage figures represent juice "from the wall" (and registered on your electrical meter) or simply juice consumed by the car itself. Rate of charge may also make a difference.

I've got a meter on the dedicated charging circuit. The wall-to-wheel electric costs are between 320 Wh/mile and 390 Wh/mile. The difference is roof or not (driving without a roof costs me 20 Wh/mile) and warm weather or not (the pump that keeps the cells in the battery at the same temperature costs me 50 Wh/mile... although this is mostly a fixed overhead per day and would cost less if you drove more miles per day). AlfredG's 200 Wh/kilometer is pretty close though a little low.

My rounded figure of 200 Wh/km is indeed from the wall. Climate is moderate, the garage does not get hot or cold (10-20°C) and the figure is for driving at legal speeds without having to prove something on every occasion. Charging is mostly at 230V/10A. I have no figures for the effect of higher charge rates. Some claim that the sweet spot is 240V/32A where eventual overheads are minimal. The blowers only start to work in summer when charging directly after a longer drive.

Of course there may be other electric cars and other battery types as well as less efficient chargers. These can then put occasionally fire to the garage - or a ferry as it happened recently.
- Alfred

My electric bill has increased a bit but nothing compared to the reduction in my gasoline bill. And that doesn't include oil changes, smog checks, etc.

My single biggest cost is tires!

Greg.

I just realized that there are Roadster owners here that have had their cars over year now. They could give us operation cost estimate over a year for Roadster. Real numbers, no estimates.

Sure. I have spent $800US on new tires (two sets rear, one set front). I plug in mostly at work, costs $0 (to me; my daily commute is 24 miles, about $1.60 to the company). About once a month I plug in at home, a full charge is about $5US, so that's about $60US. Registration and insurance are about the same as my mercedes used to be, so I'm not counting that. In 18 months and 13,000 miles, that is my total expenditure on the car.

I've estimated my charging costs for the Roadster at about $30 per month. This is quite consistent with my before/after electricity bills.

For my ICE car the cost of gasoline per month was about $180. For some reason that dropped significantly when the Roadster arrived... oh yeah, I wasn't driving it.


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