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Keep Car Unlocked at Home

Is there a way to set the Home Link or another setting so the MS does not lock when I park it in my garage at home?

yes,

control, then settings ...walk away door lock

turn it off

Excellent question. Never thought of that. One question, how does the car know if you're in the driveway versus in the garage? I would want to lock in the driveway but Keep it unlocked in the garage.

jeff
you could always set your control to not lock and then manually lock it with the key thingy when you walk away

yeah but that kind of defeats the whole purpose of the keyless thing and $3800 option that you pay for

Make a driver profile for home and set the walk away door lock setting to off in that profile. You can also adjust the seat and steering wheel adjustments to make it easier to get out of the car with that profile.

I don't think any of these answers help. The idea is that you want walk away lock during the day at work or when you go shopping, but when you park it at home in your garage, you don't want it to auto lock. And fiddling with profiles twice a day isn't going to work.

If you really want your car unlocked in your garage, just leave the key in the little pocket at the top of the door. Of course, that will likely run down the battery in the key faster, and anyone could drive away with it if they can get your garage open.

Why would you want this?

Go inside the house, make sure you have the key out of range and unlock the car with the app.

Get another key fob. Buy a monkey. Keep the monkey in the garage and train it to unlock the car every time you come home. You'll need to get a small metal box that the monkey can keep his key fob in to prevent the car from constantly pinging it.

This way, you can keep your single driver profile and set it up for walk away lock. When you walk away at home, it will lock, but the monkey will unlock it for you.

Problem solved.

I've always kept my car looked and Alarm on when its in the garage. I guess because my dad was a policeman. I've never had a reason for it to be unlocked unless I was going to leave in it or wash it. Then I would have the key with me.

We have 4 driver profiles set up in our car and it works perfectly to achieve the situation the original poster wants to happen.

I have a profile set with walk-away locks, my wife has her profile set with walk-away locks and we have two exit profiles - one 'Exit - unlocked' that we use at home in the garage that does not have walk-away locks and an 'Exit - locked' profile that we use when out of the house that has walk-away locks engaged. the Exit profiles has the driver seat and steering wheel column positioned to help make entry and exit as easy as possible.

When we get out of the car, we just press the 'Exit' profile depending on if we want the car to lock automatically or not. Now there were times when we first went with the system that we forgot to engage the exit profile, but now it's a habit and it works great.

When we get in the car, since the 'Exit' profiles have a seat position and steering wheel position that are designed to easily get out of the car and are much different than the driving position settings, we can quickly tell what profile is set. While driving the car, if we just leave the car set to our personal profiles during the day and decide not to use any of the 'Exit' profiles, the walk-away locks are engaged and we're good. If we want to get out of the car easier during the day, we can engage the 'Exit - Locked' profile after we park and the car will have the walk-away locks and be easier to enter and exit.

Now one can argue that it's a pain in the butt to do this and that one would forget. The forgetting is possible, but it's as easy as pushing the profile button and that's it. You don't even need to wait for the seat and steering wheel column to adjust after pushing the button if you're in a hurry. One can also argue that on a car like this, we shouldn't have to do this, but until Tesla comes up with something different, this hack will help the Original Poster achieve the result desired.

I like the leave the key in the car idea, if you want it unlocked, you might as well leave the key in the car! much easier than all the settings.

Portia. You'll kill the fob battery a lot quicker that way.

oh well it is a compromise.

What I do is that I double press the key fob and unlock the doors as I walk into the house (about 20 feet way from the car). Since I'm further away than the walk-away locking, the car stays unlocked. If I had better 3G coverage I would use the app. If the door handles haven't retracted yet, I lock the car first (single press) and then unlock it.

This request is already listed in the Prioritized software enhancement list, #106.

http://www.teslamotors.com/forum/forums/prioritized-software-enhancement...

I keep my fob on a pegboard about 10 feet in front of the car - far enough that the car locks, but close enough that I can easily grab it when I need to get in.

I agree that it would make sense to have the option to allow a home link have the car stay unlocked. It is a total pain for the family to wait for me and sometimes gap for me to have to remember to grab the key to get something from the car.

I think the monkey comment is not funny and totally inappropriate. Find somewhere to share your humor.

jtodtman wrote:

"Portia. You'll kill the fob battery a lot quicker that way."

I've seen this said a number of times, but I I'm not sure there is any basis for the statement.

Does someone have some reference that explains why keeping the fob near the car is an issue?

My current car recognizes when I approach and turns on courtesy lights and enable me to open the doors. Also lets me lock the doors, and everything else that the Tesla fob does. Yet I don't see any battery issues why I leave it in a cabinet near the car.

The fob is in the car every time you drive. Are people who drive a few hours every day having to replace there fob's batteries?

Just asking because I often see comments that are peoples hunches that turn into 'fact' through repetition.

I, for one, enjoyed the monkey solution.

I would just leave the key in the car and see if the fob battery life is, indeed, shortened as a result. You have two fobs...there's a control specimen for you.

Gary, communication between the car and fob increase when they've identified they're near each other. The energy consumed is trivial for the car, but not for the fob. The car must constantly ping to ensure the fob is still present and the fob must answer. When the fob is away from the car, it doesn't spend as much energy answering pings. The design is such that the car bears the onus of energy consumption for obvious reasons, especially in detecting the initial presence of the fob.

However, there is one key fact I'm not aware of: how much keeping the fob in the car decreases the battery life. More than keeping outside, yes...but I can't quantify it and it could be trivial. Battery replacement, however, is relatively trivial. Keeping the fob in the car can be done if the effect of that solution is desirable to the user. I recommend keeping a spare battery in the glove compartment in any scenario.

@cfOH
As I've always said, there are two types of people in this world-- those who appreciate the monkey solution and those who don't.

If any of you fob in the unlocked car people get your car stolen your insurance company is not going to pay out. It's like leaving your car parked with the doors unlocked and the key in the ignition.

+1 for the monkey

@michael

Michael. I understand how the key must work. It's just that, as you said, I don't think anyone has quantified this. So to say that "you will kill the battery a lot quicker that way" may not be true. Or maybe it is true.

That is why I made my final comment in my posting. I hope when people make these kinds of statements they have something to back it up.

I think your comment about keeping a spare battery around may be good until someone gets some good data on battery life.


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