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Only a 4 year/50,000 mile warranty?

According to the Model S Specs page, the warranty excluding the battery is listed as

4 year or 50,000 mile, whichever comes first, new vehicle limited warranty

I understand that this is comparable to the new vehicle warranties offered by BMW and Mercedes, but for a car that's supposed to be "way better" than an ICE and with far fewer moving parts, I was a little surprised that the warranty wasn't longer. Does anyone else have any thoughts about this?

I don't expect Tesla to offer a standard warranty better than BMW, Mercedes, or Audi in these early days. I'm personally comfortable with this basic warranty and think their battery warranty is pretty strong. I suppose an 8 year/100k mile powertrain warranty inclusive of battery, motor and PEM would be better.

On the other hand I don't expect to pay a whole lot for servicing per year. A significant rationale for my purchasing an EV will be decreased TOC (total cost of ownership) so if Tesla springs a costly annual service on us I would have to rethink the purchase.

I think this topic has been discussed on this forum already. Do Roadster owners pay around $600 per year for service? Too much for Model S...

Perhaps Tesla will offer an extended bumper-to-bumper warranty for purchase?

Elon already said the Model S maintenance would be $50/month ($600/year).

Schlermie, when did Elon make that declaration?

What's the justification for the $600/yr maintenance? What exactly would require servicing each year to justify this cost? I really hope that this fee is not already set in stone.

I also feel that the warranty period should be longer, i.e. 8yrs/100k since the Model S has no track record and Tesla is still a new company. When Hyundai first came into the market they offered 10yr/100k warranty to help reassure the consumers to try their brand and overcome their fears for reliability and quality.

Elon already said the Model S maintenance would be $50/month ($600/year). (Schlermie)

Are you sure he was referring to the Model S, not to the Roadster? Can you remember the source? This discussion reminds me of the business model for ink jet printers... somehow. ;-)

I would have thought that by now someone who has signed a contract would have asked about the maintenance costs. $600 a year is way high. What is on this car that would justify that cost. I can get coolant flushed on an ICE for under $250. I think that $600 number might be the Ranger cost for them to come to you.

The warranty I am happy with. If the car holds up for that period of time it should hold up even longer. There are not that many moving parts to worry about. I guess we are about to find out. When my last car warranty ran out I got a letter from some warranty place asking if I'd like to purchase a warranty. I opted out. So far the cost for repairs has been less than the warranty would have cost.

Extended warranties seldom benefit the purchaser. They are calculated to benefit the seller.

4 years are sub-standard in Norway, where nearly all manufacturers have a 5-year warranty. Some even offer more than 5 years, but everyone expects at least 5 years on a mass-market model.

If I drove 15,000 per year I would have my car service approx 3 times per year at an avg cost of 250 per service that adds to 750. This is for a Toyota Camry. I don't think 600 is unreasonable.

Yes, for an ICE vehicle- oils, fluids, filters etc.
What is there here? Use regen correctly, and even the brakes should last virtually the life of the car. Tires? That is not included in routine servicing. OK, maybe some bearings require lube, and even that could be overcome with sealed bearings. So, i too am wondering why $600. Also software upgrades are remotely installed. So... not even that.
Warranties here in Australia are 100000 km or 3 years. So, I am not unhappy with the warranty offered for the vehicle, especially with the long battery warranty.

Actually, not all of the software upgrades can be installed remotely; they have to done on site to prevent data file corruption.
Most of the rest of that service charge is for filters, even an electric car still has air filters on it. Add in the climate control system, which I remind you, that keeps the batteries at an even temperature, and there's still the checks on the battery pack itself, so that cell failures can be caught early and be dept with before the pack suffers damage.

IMHO, that's STILL a bargin at six hundred a year.

I hope as an IT Director that I can do my own software/firmware updates in the case of file corruptions during an update that became corrupt.

lol, I wouldn't let my IT Directory touch my databases and sure wouldn't let him update my car!!

I only trust myself as well Jason... A good IT guy is hard to find but we aren't too bad in the Bay Area... ;)

It'd be nice if they'd let you download the firmware update file, installer, and checksums to install it from your end. Then you wouldn't have to worry about corruption during transmission.

@David, I am hoping that most of the updates would be over the air and just in the cases of major updates or corruption would we resort to downloads and verifying checksums. Unlike my servers, I'm bad about checking updates for my cars or my personal devices.

Air filter? $600 air filter! Boy some of you have been driving BMWs too long. :-)

Climate control system? My A/C has worked on my car for 12 years with no issues or recharges.

Liquid coolant flush, once every 50K on an ICE. You are telling me an EV that does not have the extreme heat issues of an ICE is going to need it more often?

Software updates... FREE. I am not paying for what I get for free from almost every electronic system I have ever owned. All firmware updates on my home built systems have not had any issues and my Tyan mobo (from 2003) updates firmware thru the network. My Android tablets update automatically and wirelessly.

Battery checkups. The on board computer should be keeping track of this all the time not just once a year. Tesla is going to plug in a computer and download the cars history and issues in seconds (which should also be possible without taking it in). If there are problems it should be under warranty, not something I am billed for.

$600
- 1 air filter
- coolant flush

TOO HIGH.... unless they are coming to my house.

I don't care what anyone spends on an ICE. This is not an ICE. It's an EV which is supposed to have less maintenance. I don't drive a BMW so my oil change is about $40, 3 or 4 times a year. That's only $160. I can get air filters at Auto-zone for $10.
Try this one from a dealer in my area, "$39.95- Oil & Filter Change, 4 Tire Rotation & More! Print a Coupon Now"

According to Stephen Smith of TM.....The $600 is for the roadster. The annual maintenance cost for the Model S has not been established yet.

Prob'ly double.
>:-p

4 years are sub-standard in Norway, where nearly all manufacturers have a 5-year warranty. Some even offer more than 5 years, but everyone expects at least 5 years on a mass-market model. (jkirkebo)

Keep in mind that the current warranty conditions, as the option packages and option prices, really just apply to the US market and are merely a rough indication of what we can expect for other markets. At the Geneva auto show, I talked to Steve Davies, who directs the EU sales. He was explicit that options and pricing have not yet been determined for Europe, and that we will very likely see different options and pricing not only between Europe and the US, but also between different European countries. I assume that the details of warranty fall into the same category and are likely to be adjusted for different markets.

The AC system on an EV is VASTLY different to the one in an ICE, don't try to compare them.

Have you ever looked inside your PC case? Trust me, the filters on an EV will have more to deal with than the filters on an ICE car. Their setup is probably different as well.

The coolant system for an EV may not have quite the extremes of temperature to deal with, but they have a MUCH smaller range of acceptable temperatures, and they must be maintained at all times, not just when the car is running.

You do pay for firmware updates on your ICE, why would expect less from an EV? Their computers are FAR more sophisticated afterall.

@Vawikus "You do pay for firmware updates on your ICE, why would expect less from an EV? Their computers are FAR more sophisticated afterall."

I have never paid for a firmware update on anything, but I have to also disclose that the most advanced car I have purchased in the last 10 years were a 2003 Honda Accord, 2005 Honda Civic and a 2007 Toyota Rav4. If BWM and Mercedes charge for firmware updates then that frankly, well, sucks but would give TM the argument to do so as well. If that is the "norm" for the industry then I wouldn't be happy about it, but would understand.

It does make me wonder however, what are the list of hidden charges when buying a luxury vehicle?

1. Luxury Tax when making the purchase?
2. Insurance premiums for what would be classified as an exotic car?
3. Firmware Updates, how often and how much on average?

What else may I have missed?

@BYT:

4. Tires - The 19" or 21" tires will cost more and probably wear a lot faster than the ones on your Hondas and Toyota.
5. Data plan, but at least that's optional

I know 21" lowpro's degrade much faster but the 19's are also bad compared to the Honda Accord tires? Data plan I already have a plan for... ;)


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