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Questions: What happens when you crash and damage battery? FLAMES?

Questions:
What happens when you crash the car? Flames??? Accidents happen right?
Is there a currency price difference when you export from US or EU?
Insurance? How and what can they possibly cover OUT of warranty region?
If purchased, sent out of country, again brought back to country of purchase, warranty returns?
WHEN will Tesla grow up and create branches outside? What is stopping you guys?
Lithium ION wiki says battery spoils fast in HOT areas, hard to recycle...

Some other forum guys talking about you Tesla's cool:
http://reboot.pro/14634/

Questions:
What happens when you crash the car? Flames??? Accidents happen right?
Is there a currency price difference when you export from US or EU?
Insurance? How and what can they possibly cover OUT of warranty region?
If purchased, sent out of country, again brought back to country of purchase, warranty returns?
WHEN will Tesla grow up and create branches outside? What is stopping you guys?
Lithium ION wiki says battery spoils fast in HOT areas, hard to recycle...

Some other forum guys talking about you Tesla's cool:
reboot.pro/14634/

What the heck is this? Whatever, I'll take 'em as posted

1) Fire? Are we gonna go over this again? Fine. What's gonna catch fire in an EV? Not a damned thing. Biggest risk is the battery shocking people, and Tesla's already got the covered with a battery disconnect. Not so for an ICE with it's flammable fuel. An EVs battery isn't hard to clean up after a crash either: you can pick up most of it with a shovel. Coolant you'll need to soak up, but I'll wager that coolant isn't as nasty as gas is.

2) Yes there are different currencies in different countries. Yes, there is an exchange rate between currencies. What is this? You think Tesla is above nations economies or something?

3) Tesla builds cars, they don't supply insurance. They DO have mobile service techs, called Tesla Rangers, and Tesla also has offices on every content except Antarctica.

4) Grow up? Take your own advice idiot! Tesla's already worldwide, what more do you want????? A store on every corner????? That may happen, but it'll take TIME and MONEY to do that. Tesla hasn't had enough time to grow big enough to have the money to do that yet.

5) Li-ions are the best batteries available, especially when cared for, like the way Tesla's batteries are kept climate controlled in their battery packs. Lithium is recyclable, the market just hasn't had time to build recycling plants for it yet.

6) Of course people are talking about Tesla, they're doing something to change the world. Can you say the same?

Actualy, go to youtube and watch one of the vidos of a laptop battery burning. It's very violent, so this is an excellent question.

Actually, go to youtube and watch one of the videos of an ICE burning. It's very violent, so this is an excellent question.

What happens when a tornado hits the car? If it's an F5 does it fly in the air like an ICE?

What happens if I drive it off a cliff? Has Tesla even thought about this? They must have a deployment system like on the Mars rover missions.

I think this could be a great what if thread.....

LOTS of bad things happen in a car crash. When an EV crashes it does not spew flammable gasoline all over the place. That's one point in the EV's favor.

Li-Ion batteries can burn if they get hot enough. That's why the Tesla cars have liquid cooling for the batteries. A crash will not make them catch fire. Breaking a lithium battery open does not cause it to burst into flame.

It's curious how people misjudge risk all the time. In this case, being more afraid of the extremely low risk of a lithium battery fire than of the much greater risk of a gasoline fire. If fire is your main worry, you DEFINITELY should switch from a gas car to an EV.

Vawlkus, Sudre and daniel1948...you are awesome!

I realize that people are concerned about the fact that both flaming laptops and EV's have similar tech in them but starting threads like this are nonconstructive and it's nice to see firm but funny responses.

@jbunn:
The laptop battery never caught fire: it got hot enough to melt the plastic case, which in turn caught the tablecloth underneath the laptop on fire.

The thing about lithium ion laptop batteries is that they are thermally unstable and subject to thermal run-away: If they get too hot they will then start getting hotter rapidly if not shut down. (Some lithium chemistries, such as LiFePO4 do not have this problem.)

Tesla chose to use this kind of battery in spite of the thermal issues because it is so readily available (not dependent on one or just a few manufacturers) and it is less expensive than other, newer, types.

That's why the Tesla cars use liquid cooling to keep the battery temperature under control, and monitoring equipment (I presume) to shut down the system if the cooling were to fail. The system is even so sophisticated that the battery is maintained at a different temperature depending on whether you select performance mode or regular driving mode.

A battery fire, or battery overheating event, is FAR less likely than other, more serious events, such as getting struck by lightning or getting rammed by a drunk in an SUV. The biggest danger of driving any car is the pure kinetic energy of the vehicle at freeway speed, and the nut jobs you have to share the road with. (It's really too bad it's so easy to get a driver's license -- but that's another topic.)

"Zotye electric taxi fire caused by shoddy Chinese-built battery pack"
http://green.autoblog.com/2011/06/16/zotye-electric-taxi-fire-caused-by-...

Yeah, LiPoly batteries will puff and heat (perhaps even flame) with OVERDISCHARGE, but I think someone said tesla using LiFePO4 batteries, which can discharge to 0 safely...

Teslas batteries are carbon/cobalt -based, not carbon/FePO4. Better energy density, but requires a bit more monitoring to be safe.

I literally mean "a bit more". They are still safe.

I would say they need a lot more monitoring plus active cooling. But since Tesla does this, problem solved.

Tesla's battery pack is carefully designed to maintain battery temperature. However, it is also designed such that if one cell were to catch fire, it would not cascade to the adjacent cells. Martin Eberhard told me they tested this using a blowtorch to trigger the cell failure.

I'm sure when the Roadster came out there were a lot of similar questions about saftey and to the best of my knowledge there hasn't been any issues.

The Roadster is probably pushed harder than the Model S ever will be and I haven't heard of any flame spewing crashed Roadsters or electric shocked Roadster owners.

Remember people, the technology that Tesla is using on the Model S isn't their first go-around. Whatever saftey obstacles they had to overcome due to the batteries over heating were overcome with the development of the Roadster.

No matter how you (or Fox news) spin it there are two realities to think about when talking about vehicle fires with Evs: First, an EV doesn't have a large tank of flammable liquid attached to the vehicle. Second, everything burns. You just need to get it hot enough...

As I see it, the fire risk is far less in an EV than ICE. ICEs, especially hybrids, have gas tanks and batteries. I've not heard or seen any hybrid batteries bursting into flames from crashes (and as a volunteer firefighter / EMT I've been on countless motor vehicle accidents with hybrids over the years). The EV, aside from not having the gas tank, has intrinsic heat protection due to how batteries operate and dissipate heat. Sure, some will burst into flames, but surely not at a rate greater than an ICE. Gas and oil regularly leak from cars after a crash and they almost NEVER explode or burst into flames. The battery system will be far less flammable than gas and oil, so I anticipate few, if any, issues with flame-outs of EVs.

The fear of EV fires is much like the statements on EV / hybrids having a larger carbon footprint than ICE. It is all propaganda and hype by those with a vested interest in the failure of these new technologies. Take the politics and emotion out of it and look to the science.

@Mike

I am wondering why you call this "new technologies" - the electric vehicles were invented in the late 1800's and early 1900's and some of them ran on Edison batteries. Edison himself had several EV's and he said " we don't need better cars, we need better batteries" which is true today as well... He tried to save the EV by inventing better batteries, but the technology at the time wasn't helping much...

I think there were more EV manufacturing companies back then than now, check this link if you want to know more - http://www.earlyelectric.com/carcompanies.html

They were not as fast, but some had greater mileage than some of today's poorly-designed EV's...

@Benzman - fair point, the EV isn't new. That said, I would consider the modern iteration to be a new technology. The batteries and systems are leaps beyond the EV of the early part of the last century.


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