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Tesla grabs another apple employee. Very interesting.

Did she get a promotion to Hacker Queen?


So now TM has 10 programmers?

If you want to work at Tesla, first get a job at Apple.

Interesting that she is a security expert.

It is probably their next big concern. What happens to the stock and sales when someone hacks a car in motion and disconnects the breaks? Once one idiot succeeds the car becomes a target. I am glad they are being proactive on this issue.

It is probably their next big concern. What happens to the stock and sales when someone hacks a car in motion and disconnects the breaks? Once one idiot succeeds the car becomes a target. I am glad they are being proactive on this issue.

wee;
Yeah, and hacking the brakes would be even worse! It might cause double-postingpumping all over da place! (No para breaks?) ;p

This isn't just a concern for Tesla, GM has had to deal with this since their cars are connected via On-Star. There was a story a long while ago where someone was able hack into a series of cars on a dealers lot, unlocked the doors and drive off with 9 cars.

This is whole problem with "connected cars". I speaking of the government's push to have all cars talking to each other. Not even the Pentagon's computer systems are impervious to hacking. Unless they build into the car's system an ability to go into "manual mode" in the event of a faulty/no signal from the "system", then this is a train wreck waiting to happen.

I'm that Tesla would like to enrich their iPhone app and also add some other online functionality.

Amongst other ideas, I could imagine having the car drive with just the owner's phone without the need for the key fob, but then I can imagine too that some beefed-up security would be a smart idea.

I suspect she was hired to deal with the embedded operating system used by the center console and dash. Module updating of the type that deals with engine mapping (ICE), brake, suspension and like modules is a completely different animal. OEMs have gotten downright militant on protecting their module reflash process over the past few years and have implemented things as crazy as 128 byte RSA encrypted RipeMD160 hashes which are passed to the module after programming. If the decrypted hash does not equal the new code's hash, the code is not signed and the module does not run.

It's a real blast to find your way around these things...... Come to think about it, some of the ways around these measures came from the phone update protection mechanisms. If she is from the jail break portion of the Apple house she may very well be a good fit for the module protection task. Even if she is knowledgable in this area, decompiling PPC or C167 code in Ida is a cultivated talent. Anyone that wants to play with Tesla's systems needs some very specific skills.


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