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Window fogging?

Has anyone experienced interior window fogging? Not condensation, I'm talking about the interior glass needing cleaning because of a milky residue building up on the interior of the windshield due to chemical outgassing. New cars often experience this.

The reason I'm asking is my wife is very sensitive to the "new car smell". She can't tolerate a Mercedes Benz because of the interior air quality.

I'm wondering about the Tesla interior.

I haven't seen any official testing yet. Does anyone know if there's been testing done?

I'd really like to get a Tesla, but I can't buy a car my wife can't ride in.

Not sure about "official testing", but the Model S definitely has that new car smell. I've had my car for just over a week and have noticed that the windshield is looking a little milky around the corners. The car has been sitting in the sun on and off, so that may have accelerated the process, I don't know.

Have you considered keeping the sun roof in the vented position and cracking one or more windows to keep the air moving through the vehicle?

My rear window has had the milky problem but went away after 2 cleanings over 2 months.

Uh, oh. That doesn't sound good.

I am scheduled for a test drive next week. I'll see how strong the smell is then. It's not the "smell" per se, it's the chemicals that produce the smell that are the problem.

We do have to air out our "new to us" cars before she can drive them.

Fogging in cold inside the window was often cured with multiple interior cleanings.

I'm really sensitive to smells. When I did my test drive the car did not smell. Tesla doesn't appear to apply those smelly new car chemicals. Ill bet you don't have any problems.

@Brian H,

The problem is not the fogging. It's the chemicals that make the fog. PVCs, chlorine, bromine, formaldehyde, etc. These are toxic. Most people tolerate them. My wife cannot.

A car that fogs has a higher level of these indoor pollutants than one that does not. I can clean the "fog" off. But the chemicals are still present in the air in the car.

Any car I get, I expect to have to "Bake it" in the sun to accelerate the outgassing. But some cars are worse than others. Surprisingly, Mercedes Benz is one of the worst. I think they think their buyers prefer to have that "new car" smell, and not realize it's toxic.

I'm going for a test drive next week. I KNOW I'm going to love the car. But, I'm probably going to have to put my purchase on hold until Tesla gets some "Certified Pre-Owned" cars back from the leasing program. That's probably a couple years away.

That said, we currently drive Hondas. It was a coincidence, but Honda is the manufacturer with the best indoor air quality. We bought ours used, so they had already outgassed. I need to sit in a new one, and compare it to the new Tesla.

@Amped Realtor,

How do your clients like the Tesla? I'd be afraid to use it to take clients to houses because they'd be paying attention to the car more than the houses!

When my wife is in the car, she will drive with the recirculate cycle on because she doesn't want other car exhaust and diesel fumes entering the car.

Having the pano roof would help getting the car aired out as I'm "baking it".

We moved from the city to rural Georgia to get away from the air pollution.

Once it's outgassed, I think the Tesla would be great for her: no gasoline fumes, oil, a lot less rubber parts heating up (fan belts), etc. She likes to camp, can't stay in motels/hotels because of the chemicals, so she could camp in the Tesla, and use the electric a/c at a campsite. There's a good thread on this at TeslaMotorClub.

Under how many mattresses can she feel a pea? ;)

I found the overall new car smell to be less than what I have seen in other vehicles. No milky residue that I have seen either. Have had several hot days with interior temp at 105 at one point. Absolutely love the car.


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