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Anti-theft Charging On Travels

Are there any anti-theft measure during charging when travelling long distances? Say you are stopping over at a motel by the highway, you plug in the $1000+ cable for over night charging on a parking lot. My concern is won't the cable be easily get stolen as they are very expensive (similar to copper metal thieves ripping valuable metal off buildings, etc.) and also the car can get vandalized, while it is still plugged in unattended on a motel parking lot? I am sure the cables plugged into a car attracts more attention for potential vandals and thieves. What are the security features implemented to prevent this scenario on long road trips in an unfamiliar area?

Sound effects, "Zzsp, ZZ, Zzzzt!

ZzzzzzZZZZ...

".

While we are waiting for the exotic future of charging, for theft prevention of charging cables maybe Tesla can at least do what Volt does. If someone pulls the charging cord out of a Volt when it is plugged in and the car is locked, the alarm goes off (the horn starts beeping and lights start flashing) to scare away the thief and draw attention to what is going on. IMHO a simple solution to implement while more grandiose future ones are being developed.

@nvjx | NOVEMBER 7, 2012: maybe Tesla can at least do what Volt does. If someone pulls the charging cord out of a Volt when it is plugged in and the car is locked, the alarm goes off

From the Model S Owner's Guide:

• To prevent unauthorized unplugging of the charging cable, Model S must be unlocked or able to recognize a key before you can disconnect the charging cable.

Thanks Alex K. I should read the manual. It would still be better in this situation if the alarm went off to scare the person away and notify the owner something was amiss, if the owner happened to be nearby.

nvjx;
How? If the cable can't be removed, what triggers the alarm? Tugging?

@Vawlkus @MB3

Actually it's "repressed".

DENNIS: Listen -- strange women lying in ponds distributing
swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive
power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some
farcical aquatic ceremony.
ARTHUR: Be quiet!
DENNIS: Well you can't expect to wield supreme executive power
just 'cause some watery tart threw a sword at you!
ARTHUR: Shut up!
DENNIS: I mean, if I went around sayin' I was an empereror just
because some moistened bint had lobbed a scimitar at me they'd
put me away!
ARTHUR: Shut up! Will you shut up!
DENNIS: Ah, now we see the violence inherent in the system.
ARTHUR: Shut up!
DENNIS: Oh! Come and see the violence inherent in the system!
HELP! HELP! I'm being repressed!
ARTHUR: Bloody peasant!
DENNIS: Oh, what a give away. Did you here that, did you here
that, eh? That's what I'm on about -- did you see him repressing
me, you saw it didn't you?

RED QUEEN: Off with his head!

Nice to hear Model S might have some such cable anti-theft feature. I just got a used Roadster and tried the simple experiment of locking the car, setting alarm and then removing the charger. No feedback, just comes off, ready to walk away...

It does seem that since the car does so much synching and communicating with the charge supply that simple removal while locked could trigger an alarm, but I read the owners manual cover to cover and the only anti-theft statement I saw was around the doors or trunk being opened trigger alarm. Cable disconnect should just be a firmware upgrade away...

Having slogged through the many nonsense posts and tangents on this thread, I don't think I saw any solve for Roadsters so far.

Perhaps this is a more theoretical than actual problem so far.

Yes, other than copper theft, what would the motive/market be for a stolen Roadster connector?

@Brian H: The same motivation that morons who key cars have.

Another update on the wireless charging front (there are more on page 3 of this thread):
http://green.autoblog.com/2013/01/02/spanish-collaboration-tests-wireles...


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