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How the metal piece that punctured the battery was found

I loved Elon's response to the fire incident and this can ease the mind of current and future owners that Tesla Model S is a very safe car. However I am having difficulty regarding the identification of the metal piece. It says in the official report by the Regional Fire Authority of Kent, WA. "Driver stated that he hit an object in the HOV lanes of SB 167. The car started to run poorly and he pulled off the freeway. The car started to smoke and caught fire."
There is something I am not able to visualize. It happened on the freeway and I assume road crew (I am not sure who they are) did not show up until a later time, probably after the fire crew. He was driving on the HOV lane (carpool lane). How would road crew find and retrieve the metal piece without stopping traffic? There is no indication that I have read that traffic was stopped. Or was it?
Anyone know? Thanks.

I would like to see photos of the object and the dimensions of it. And photos of the hole in the battery pack.

Great response by Tesla by the way.

I think it was found on a grassy knoll. It was near a book suppository.

" It was near a book suppository. "

Ouch!

;)

I assumed it stuck under the car after the impaling.

Easy, they bring in a few CHP officers to slow down, and temporarily stop traffic, pickup the projectile, and move on. I have seen it happen many times on major freeways in Los Angeles.

Unfortunately, one of the worst things about driving in the HOV lane is; if something is in your way, chances are, you will have no choice but to hit it, or come to a complete stop.

I was told it was dragged with the car.

@Brit
Here is a quote form Elon, "Earlier this week, a Model S traveling at highway speed struck a large metal object, causing significant damage to the vehicle. A curved section that fell off a semi-trailer was recovered from the roadway near where the accident occurred and, according to the road crew that was on the scene, appears to be the culprit."
I am not sure how the crew got to the carpool lane without stopping the cars on the freeway and how they knew it was the piece that caused the piercing.
I just like to know these details, they are important. Elon says "appears to be the culprit."

I'm not sure that the CHP officers would want to travel a thousand miles to slow down traffic on that highway. Doesn't Washington state have a police force? :-)

WayneH;
I've seen some OCD types, but Jeez ...

@ausdma
I thought a suppose-atory was a place people go to make ass-umptions.

It would be an irony had the metal object been a piece of a truck exhaust pipe or a gas tank. :)

Conspiracy theorists doubting the facts even though the owner of the car and Tesla corroborate? Give me a break.

@mjs
Riiight. I'll have to deposit-tory that fact in my head and people that know me are clear where that lives.

Frankly, I am disappointed by some of the responders. I thought people who had enough wealth to purchase a 100,000 dollar car would be more intelligent, and less silly, and provide better responses than blame it on conspiracy. That is the easy way out. I am trained as a scientist and critical thinker. There are three questions that I am asking:

1. How was the metal piece picked up if the incident occurred in the carpool lane. (also, if it was a large piece did other cars hit it and get damaged, or not get damaged?)
2. How do we know a metal piece, if found, was the right one. Elon himself admits in his blog, the metal piece "appears to be the culprit." What if it was another piece, a smaller one, but not the one blamed.
3. How did the "road crew" know where to look if the driver drove some distance after the collision and then found an exit.

You may wish to continue with silly responses but they do not help this discussion. I think these are legitimate questions. The Model S is an amazing car and I want it to succeed. If it happened once it could happen again. With critical thinking and perhaps slight change in design this could perhaps be avoided in a future model. If it occurs one more time it could spell big trouble for the company and that would be a shame.

I understand your curiosity on this, but it really isn't that extraordinary an event. If it wasn't a Tesla, it wouldn't be worth thinking twice about. I live in the area and there are dozens of similar incidents every day. Responding to and managing accidents, including short term traffic stoppage, is so routine that I doubt anyone on the scene really paid much attention to the details. I know for a fact that investigation by local authorities is limited to death and major casualty incidents only. As frustrating as it may be, this is probably as clear as things will get in terms of the on-scene investigation.

@wayneH

Since when does money equate with intelligence?

Who cares, stocks up again, the best car ever and please get ready it won't be the last issue with Tesla because is a CAR and accidents happen. Please move on.

vouteb- +1 just look Fox rich viewers

@Wayne
I don't know what you are expecting. There is obviously nobody responding on this thread or any other related thread that knows the answers to these questions. It either was or wasn't the right piece of metal. Either way, I'm pretty sure Elon knows the importance of all this and has been transparent about what he does know. There is no advantage to Tesla to cover anything up or sweep it under the rug. If they know something that requires design changes, they will make them because that is what is in their long term best interest. Everything I have seen from looking at this company over the last several months indicates to me that is true.

Most of the available information can be found here.

http://www.teslamotorsclub.com/showthread.php/22173-Model-S-Accident-Fire

Bring popcorn and a sleeping bag. The thread is a long trek.

What Wayne is doing is the oldest trick in the book in opposition politics... cat doubt, question facts, throw around some smoke and then complain that you can't see.

1. How was the metal piece picked up if the incident occurred in the carpool lane. (also, if it was a large piece did other cars hit it and get damaged, or not get damaged?)

The piece was identified BY THE DRIVER as falling off of a semi-truck. As the driver knew where the incident occurred, and took THE FIRST EXIT, it isn't a stretch to assume it was removed from the roadway as it was identified as having such an angle as to create a leveraging action against the battery when struck at highway speed.

2. How do we know a metal piece, if found, was the right one. Elon himself admits in his blog, the metal piece "appears to be the culprit." What if it was another piece, a smaller one, but not the one blamed.

How do you KNOW your daddy is your daddy? Your mamma told you so. Here in the real world we go by preponderance of the evidence including damage to the vehicle.

3. How did the "road crew" know where to look if the driver drove some distance after the collision and then found an exit.

The distance he drove was to the next off ramp. State Police have functioning eyeballs and connected brain cells.

@JimAlger

"The piece was identified BY THE DRIVER as falling off of a semi-truck."

That's interesting. Do you actually mean that the driver of the Model S saw the large metallic object falling off of a semi-truck?

I am wondering, did the driver of the Model S by chance in a split second have a look at the license plate of that particuar semi-truck? If he did, then that could lead to the arrest of the owner of that large metallic object, I think. Or am I wrong about this theory?

@JimAlger
This is what was reported initially, "The incident happened as the Tesla's driver was traveling southbound on state Route 167 through the Seattle suburb of Kent, said Trooper Chris Webb of the Washington State Patrol. The driver said he believed he had struck some metal debris on the freeway, so he exited the highway and the vehicle became disabled."
The press release by Tesla said, "Yesterday, a Model S collided with a large metallic object in the middle of the road, causing significant damage to the vehicle."
If it was a large metallic object, wouldn't other cars in that lane have struck it, too? And wouldn't the driver had mentioned it to the trooper?
I do not appreciate being attacked in the manner that you have for raising legitimate questions. Thus far we have had the version by the company, we have not had an independent analysis.

@ Benz

The truck wouldn't have been in the carpool lane so the owner cannot claim the Tesla was following too closely. I believe the truck was stolen however and the true owner isn't really liable.

Also, it's likely the driver didn't act alone. He and the men who pushed the metal piece off of the truck were probably paid by unseen, but powerful men holding short positions on TSLA. The truck was ditched shortly after the incident. Such a vehicle could remain unnoticed for months under the triple underpass at Dealer Plaza. It is NOT a coincidence that the Texas Automobile Dealers Association has offices near to this very location.

In the time it took me to read this thread, we had about 5 car fires in the US. In the two days this thread has been active, we had an average of 1 fatality by car fire in the US.

According to the NFPA:
"On average, 17 automobile fires were reported per hour. These fires killed an average of four people every week."
http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/vehicles

I am not trying to be a smart-alec, but am simply trying to illustrate that this car fire is being treated (and rightly so) by the authorities like any of the other countless car fires and single car accidents that happen routinely in this country.

I think that fire frequency will go gown as when there are more well engineered pure battery EV's on the road.

Wayne - seriously, I would concentrate your efforts on the book suppository.

...oops
go down
...not go gown

Pretty obvious where you put that book suppository - The End


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