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Automatic High Beams?

I reserved a Model S. I currently drive an X-5 BMW, and one feature that I find extremely useful is automatic high beams. Are there any plans to have this available on the Model S?

Ross. May I suggest you address your queries to the Tesla Bulletin Board question section at the top of the Forum topics.

I read somewhere that the Model S already has this with the Technology package. Was in the users guide I believe.

No no, sorry, that was with the MobileEye installable accessory, my mistake!!

You need the mobile eye.

Why would you trust a computer to turn on your high-beams?

Where I live, turning on your high-beams with on-coming traffic is seriously dangerous, and driving behind someone with your high-beams on, can get your ass kicked.

Why would you trust a computer to turn on your high-beams? (TikiMan)

Because it works really well. Not only doesn't it turn on high-beams when there is no traffic in front of you, but it never forgets to turn them off in time when other cars appear on the scene, too. Actually safer than manual high-beams IMO.

I was quite skeptical initially, but it really does work very well! The sensor on my BMW is extremely impressive in being able to spot an oncoming or leading car from far away and turning the high beams off. Sometimes it reacts faster than I do.

@ross.zeltser@bmc.org | NOVEMBER 25, 2012: I was quite skeptical initially, but it really does work very well! The sensor on my BMW is extremely impressive in being able to spot an oncoming or leading car from far away and turning the high beams off. Sometimes it reacts faster than I do.

I have this feature in my Lexus RX450h. Unfortunately, it is poorly implemented. It works OK for oncoming traffic and when approaching someone form behind, but if fails when approaching an intersection with a waiting car and also when it gets reflections from road signage. It's also annoying in that it turns the high beams off when going below 20mph, which makes driving through my neighborhood irritating at night. Of course all this can be disabled, but it's linked to the automatic headlight function, which also has to be disabled.

If Tesla is listening, I would recommend that if you implement this, then please take the above issues into account. Hopefully, BMW has solved all those problems.

I have this feature in my Lexus RX450h. Unfortunately, it is poorly implemented. [...] Hopefully, BMW has solved all those problems. (Alex K)

In my post above, I was in fact referring to my experience with the latest BMW 5 series (rental car). I was very impressed with how flawlessly the feature worked. In particular, in all instances I encountered, it correctly told apart road signage reflections from other cars.

I believe it when I have a confirmed experience of driving towards an oncoming X-5 at night.

I always see people driving around with high beams at night at it pisses me off, and it's totally unnecessary on our well developed streets.

@Volger.Berlin

Brian H wird Ihnen für den Aufbau des letzten Satzes zu sprengen!

LOL. I meant "he's going to blast you." I don't think it translates to that. Yikes!

Getting Amped Soon, your German is not correct but, well, guessable! ;-) However, even after revisiting the sentence in question, I cannot find anything wrong with it. Well, I guess, I'll learn soon enough...

It's fine structurally, but "told apart" applies to objects or events of the same class. "... it correctly distinguished between road signage and other cars." would be more correct and clearer.

Alright, thanks.

I have auto high-beams on my Escallade (Hybrid, of course) and it works flawlessly. In 3 years of driving with it I have never had anyone flash me while on coming, and it goes to low-beam when behind other cars by at least a quarter mile or more, never a problem. Frankly, it changes from high to low and low to high exactly as I would have done it manually.

@Volker.Berlin - My two cents. The expression "told apart" is not ever correct AFAIK, or at a minimum is awkward. Additionally, your sentence makes it sound that the road sign reflections were from the "other cars," not that you were talking about two different things: road sign reflections and the headlights of oncoming cars.

Brian H is of course correct but I wanted to explain it a bit more. So to be really clear, go with "In particular, in all instances I encountered, it correctly distinguished between road signage reflections and the headlights of other cars."

I have the Mobileye doing this on my Model S and it works quite well. I have never seen it have highs on directly at a car traveling toward or away from me. I have seen it with highs on when a car is perpendicular to me at a distant stop sign, but it turned off before I got too close. It also automatically turns off if the street is well lit with street lights. I mostly see the highs come on when I drive dark mountain or country roads.

I would like the option to disable the hi beams, like by having the automatic mode only engage when I switch to high beams on the steering wheel stalk. I'm talking to Mobileye about this today.

@Getting Amped, I believe the "to tell apart" is correct idiomatic English, although not formal English. "My brother has twin girls, and I cannot tell them apart" is just fine, particularly for spoken English. Also: "they cannot be told apart."

@DouglasR - I agree with your examples, but I still don't think "it told apart" is correct English, spoken or otherwise.

With Volker's usage, you are saying it is correct to say, "My brother has twin girls, and I visited them yesterday. I told them apart." I think it would be more correct to say, "I could tell them apart."

"They cannot be told apart." is fine because "they" refers to the things that are "told apart." I think when you say "it told" or "I told" it literally means "it" or "I" spoke in the past tense. We use "could tell" to mean "discern", but I don't think we use "told" the same way.

Of course I could be wrong! I'm sure we've confused Volker.Berlin royally now.

@Getting Amped,

No, I agree with you that VB's original usage was incorrect. I thought you were saying that the expression "told apart" is never correct.

Now back to our regular scheduled programming . . .

DouglasR;
Twins is a fine example of "objects of the same class".

But then, as Hamlet said, “I am but mad North North west; when the wind is Southerly, I knowe a Hauke, from a hand saw.”

There is now apparently general agreement that the “hand saw” in that line was originally “heronshaw,” a dialectical English form of “heron,” meaning that Hamlet was contrasting two types of birds, rather than a bird and a carpentry tool.

@Brian H - that's actually very interesting!

But do you know a raven from a writing desk?

Nevermore!

Is this a competition to see how far off topic we can take a thread? :-)

Are we able to see the difference ?

How do we select the winner? When to announce and who would be a judge?

You all win, now back on topic! :P :)


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