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Driving through water

how deep of a puddel can a model s go through

Not very deep at all. Just like any other car not designed for fording. If you raise the model s all the way up you are still only going to be safe with probably 6-9 inches or so I think.

Someone posted here previously that drove thru some water and the outcome wasn't good.

Must have missed that post. Theoretically Model S could work completely submerged like a submarine, but I guess at some point electronics get wet and fry.

Do you remember which part caused the failure? Motor? Battery? That high voltage unit next to passenger side wheel well?

My old Fiat didn't fail in well over 15 inches of water. I expect that Model S should handle small puddle like that just fine, just don't park there.

Must have missed that post. Theoretically Model S could work completely submerged like a submarine, but I guess at some point electronics get wet and fry.

It pulls in air for the drive train cooling system, which probably hasn't been designed to seamlessly switch to water cooling when submerged. This could lead to overheating of some components which might damage them.

The car also has a mammal-based control system for which inadequate provision has been made for extended submerged operation. :p

AFAIK all components of Model S drivetrain are liquid-cooled.

I'm interested to find out which kind of damage was caused to that that "outcome was not good" car. I have seen some cars getting in surprise flood while parked in sidewalk during short thunderstorm. Doesn't last long, but long enough that it might be a problem.

The drive train is liquid cooled, but that liquid is cooled by radiators which in turn are cooled by the outside air being blown across them.

Water transfers heat better than air, so it should make cooling easier, not harder. Those usually have fans to pull air and those fans could break, but that's minor damage and easily repaired and should not cause car to stop.

I think the most vulnerable part is that high voltage thingamodo inside passenger side front wheel well. If that goes car stops. It's not very low though, so it would need quite a bit of water before that gets wet.

Timo wrote:
"Water transfers heat better than air, so it should make cooling easier, not harder. Those usually have fans to pull air and those fans could break, but that's minor damage and easily repaired and should not cause car to stop."

If the cooling system (fans, ducting, etc) hasn't been designed to work with water as well as air, and I consider it very improbable that it has been, then I would put zero money on the system working properly when only water is available. :-)

Yeah, fans as robust as propellers, able to ramp down speed when impelling water. No prob!

Does it actually have fans? BEV doesn't heat up when not in motion so water pump should be enough to circulate coolant and cool things down. It has radiators, but it should heat up much less than ICE so fans are not necessarily needed. Airflow from movement while at motion should be enough to cool drivetrain down.

Even if cooling system completely fails when submerged it shouldn't still cause permanent damage unless it stays that way for a long time. Things heat up slowly in BEV and air is not needed for any part of the drivetrain.

So driving thru deep puddle shouldn't be very bad for Model S, which is why I'm curious what happened to that "outcome was not good" car. What was the vulnerable component?

The AC clearly uses fans and radiators.

Fan at the radiator behind the nose cone? Or just to blow cooled air to cabin?

Both?

The battery cooling needs a fan. The reason is that while fast charging, it needs to cool the pack, with air not moving around the vehicle.


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